Sardinia Part Three : Bosa

Our last stop on this whirlwind week exploring Sardinia was the medieval town of Bosa, set on the Temo river. Little did I know that we saved the most picturesque for last. The palette of colors stretching before us was reminiscent of a Paul Klee painting, incidentally one of my favorite artists. With this kaleidoscopic view from our hotel room terrace, I was already smitten before even setting foot in the old town.

Mornings and late afternoons were spent lost amidst the maze of colorful streets, each building laden with its own wall of flowers. Streets were lined with recycled tomato cans converted into hand-painted flower pots.  The entire town blossomed beneath the mid-summer sun.




I became completely smitten with the attention to color and detail in this vibrant town. Truly a living painting!

Our last morning we walked up to the castle in the heat, seeking shade while admiring the views from above.


My favorite architecture in Bosa was this strip of pastel colored houses lining the river, once tanneries dating back to the 19th century. Now it seems, perfect for loftlike residences.

The colors of Bosa and the feeling of Sardinia would stay with me for a long time. At least until the next visit.

Sardinia Part Two : The Dunes

Our next destination was Sardinia’s west coast, called Costa Verde for its lush greenery. After making a few stops to explore the mainland and take several dips in the sea during what was in effect a heatwave, we arrived to our home in the dunes.

Sometimes life is most beautiful at its simplest. While I do love five-star luxury, this was a different type of star setting. We slept in what resembled a cabin with a view of the sea, dining on local cheese, bread and wine beneath a sky filled with stars. And if you looked closely enough you may just find one falling. We did.


In the morning we ran down to the sea for a swim on a completely deserted beach. THIS was paradise defined.

We spent the day on the beach taking shade beneath an umbrella and cooling off in the refreshing sea.

Night fell and with the setting sun we continued on to our last destination, one of Sardinia’s most picturesque.

Sardinia Part One : Carloforte

This year for my birthday at the end of July, a certain Italian planned a week in Sardinia. It would be my first time on this island, and his second. We flew into Cagliari, picked up a rental car, stopped by one of the magical beaches Sardinia is known for, and headed to our first destination, the island of San Pietro.

The only town on this island of 6,500 inhabitants is Carloforte. We settled in at charming hotel Villa Pimpina in the town’s center. Our room boasted a grand terrace with views of the town and the sea.


We were completely charmed by Carloforte’s maze of colorful streets and the warmth of its locals. My Italian even spoke with them in dialect. As it turns out, the Carlofortini are of Genovese descent, having arrived to San Pietro via Tunisia in 1738. With them they brought customs and foods from Genoa including focaccia and pesto. Surrounded by tastes of Liguria, we both felt very much at home!

Our mornings were spent exploring the town and mingling with the locals. Afternoons were spent discovering one of San Pietro’s many beaches. Every evening we enjoyed live music and performances in the main square. So much culture for such a small island! For dinner we feasted on tuna dishes, the island’s specialty. Tuna in more ways than I’ve ever imagined, including tuna lasagna, a fast favorite. The best tuna meals were had at Ristorante Da Andrea Osteria della Tonnara, where we even dined two nights in a row. Another favorite restaurant was Al Tonno Di Corsa.

Three days and many birthday celebrations later, it was time to leave San Pietro and return to the mainland. Next stop adventures in Costa Verde…

Torre Aurora in Cinque Terre

Having just returned from holidays in Italy, starting with Sardinia and ending with beautiful moments spent with friends and family in Cinque Terre, I have much to share from the last three weeks. Let me begin with the newest addition to my Insider’s Guide to Monterosso. A must for anyone planning a visit. Torre Aurora has quickly become one of my favorite places for an aperitivo with a view. In all my travels I have yet to discover such stellar cocktails combined with such stunning views.

Opened just two months ago, this bar/restaurant is set in a historic 13th century tower, and run by a local.

From the many terraces you have stunning views of Monterosso, as well as all of Cinque Terre in the distance.



You also have a direct view of one of my favorite restaurants L’Ancora della Tortuga, as well as the beaches of Monterosso.

So what’s on the menu at Torre Aurora? Aside from custom cocktails including the famous Aperol Spritz, you can order small plates of local anchovies or octopus salad. Arrive for dinner and feast on Ligurian specialties including fresh pasta and fish. Just be sure to make a reservation!

In case you’re looking for me during the early evening hours next spring or summer, this is where I’ll be.

Weekend in Valencia

This year, to celebrate our 6th wedding anniversary we flew to Valencia. I hadn’t been since the student days and was curious to rediscover this city in Spain’s Costa Blanca. Especially with my adventurous Italian. We arrived on a Saturday and settled in to boutique hotel Vincci Mercat in the historic center. So how did we choose to spend 48 hours in this diverse city? By exploring and eating of course. It’s not everyday you’re in the land of paella… In addition to our favorite authentic Spanish dining spots, here’s my guide to this eclectic port city.

EAT LOCAL: For the best tapas head straight to Casa Montaña. Established in 1836, this local legend is both a tapas bar and a restaurant. We were lucky to find a table at the more casual bar, and loved every bite of of our seafood, meat and vegetable plates. If you’re looking for top paella, you’ll find it at La Riuà in the historic center or Casa Carmela on the beach. The latter is an institution and reservations are a must. Keep in mind paella is eaten at lunch and takes around 30 minutes to prepare. Well worth the wait!

EAT GOURMET: For our anniversary dinner we discovered Navarro, a real gem. This family run restaurant in the historic center dating from 1951, serves creative cuisine with all ingredients sourced from local markets. Whether it’s lobster paella or seafood salad with cucumber gelato, you will not be disappointed. One of the lovely sisters Guillermina, will make sure of that! Don’t forget to try their sangria, the best I’ve tasted.

SHOPPING: If you’re looking for specialties in the form of cheese and meat, head straight to the Mercado Central.  Over 8,000 square meters including a separate section for fish, you’ll find almost 300 vendors selling all local produce. Even if you’re not in the mood to shop or taste, walking around this market is an experience!

EAT SWEETS: A specialty of Valencia is a drink called horchata. This sweet milky drink is made from pressed chufas (tiger nuts). While drinking it you dip large finger-shaped pastries called fartóns, and enjoy! Horchatería de Santa Catalina is the best and most charming spot in town.

VISIT: Undoubtedly the most impressive place to visit is Santiago Calatrava’s City of Arts and Sciences. This entertainment-based cultural and architectural center merits an entire day, or weekend if you can spare it. You really do feel as though you’ve entered another world.

BEACH IT: What makes Valencia such a desirable city for both locals and tourists is its beach life. Only thirty minutes via bus from the historic center you’ll find yourself lounging on the beach. After a dip in the warm water, find a shady spot and enjoy a siesta, you’ll probably need it!

In other news, I’m honored to be nominated as best expat blog! Please take a moment to vote here. Merci!

Packing for Paris

Several years ago, I left behind my earthly possessions and traveled the world. One of the greatest challenges in this journey of 13 months and 5 continents (and a total of 32 countries) was what to pack? One backpack sized suitcase would carry my new nomadic life. While I prepared this bag with great care, a new freedom greeted me, as I no longer felt encumbered by my possessions. Along the way I discovered how little is actually necessary, be it a week, a month or a year.

In the years that followed, I became an expert at packing and have learned to live out of a carry-on during my frequent jaunts to Italy, Spain or the French countryside. When women ask me what to bring when traveling to my current home of Paris, I am well equipped with a response. Men need not worry too much as jeans and a fitted shirt will suffice in most settings.

Since the majority of travel to Paris takes place during the Spring, Summer and Fall months, less is more. Regardless of how long you’ll be spending in the City of Lights, you don’t need attire for more than a week. After that, unless your hotel has laundry service, it’s time to discover the laverie automatique, otherwise known as the laundromat. It might even be wise to under pack, as Paris’s department stores and limitless boutiques revealing an array of French brands, are worth exploring. Or join me on a fashion tour!

Paris is by all accounts the fashion capital, but unless you’re planning to dine in 5-star settings, you can leave your stilettos at home. Street style takes over the right and left banks, where latest trends mix with vintage classics. There’s an understated elegance pervasive in the Parisian woman’s uniform.

So, what exactly is needed for a week stay? A jacket or coat (depending on the season), a sweater, casual shirts both long and short sleeve and a simple white button-down will have your top half covered. For the bottom, a pair of comfortable jeans, elegant slacks or jeans, a skirt and a little black dress. If it’s summertime, make that two dresses and a pair of shorts. Yes, Parisians do wear shorts, but leave the sweatpants at home.

As for shoes, a pair of trendy sneakers, comfortable walking shoes or boots, and a pair of flats or low heels for the evening. Ballerinas are a favorite of La Parisienne. Bring a bag to carry your daily essentials, sunglasses for the Parisian sun, a clutch for dinners out, a scarf for chilly evenings and an umbrella for rainy days. Finally, a hint of jewelry for the finishing touch. Make sure your separates mix and match well, and pack only what you feel your best in. Confidence is the best accessory!

Now book that ticket, start packing, and head for the fashion show that is Paris. Once you arrive you can read more about Paris on Bonjour Paris, where this article first appeared. Or send me a note and I’ll share my tips!

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